Today want to share another lovely article you should read! https://fluentwoof.com/benefits-of-having-a-dog/

We cannot agree more πŸ™‚

Yes, people gift pets on Valentine’s Day!

Many people welcome new pets into the household around holidays like Valentine’s Day. Often these pets are surprise gifts, which is something our team does not condone.

Since it happens, www.betterpet.com put together a fantastic guide with useful tips for these new pet owners – pet parenting basics, pet-proofing a home, scheduling a vet visit, budgeting, andΒ what to do if a pet needs to be rehomed.

Here it is: https://betterpet.com/gifted-a-pet/

1 day ago

Willem Esterhuysen
Hello furry lovers😊I just want to mention and let note...i have been TNR kitties in Gobabis the last 14 months...have sterilized and RELEASED close to 140cats.If not more.So many kitties came through my home to heal and be adopted.I find it strange that so many people dislike and even hate cats.It is mind bending to understand that a person can actually HATE a animal.What a shame.I just want to thank the good people that support me.Also Big thankyou to HAH and those that support this organization. ...
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2021 is more than half through, we are close to August already. We thought you might be interested in how many dogs and cats @haveaheartnamibia (also on Instagram) has been able to help so far πŸ™‚Take a guess and have a look below!*****So far this year, we were able to spay or neuter an amazing 1400 dogs and cats from all over Namibia!!! Wow!! This is so fantastic and we are a bit lost for words!As Have a Heart is fully dependent on donations, we are beyond grateful for YOUR support! Without support from many people, we would not be able to help a single cat or dog!THANK YOU!!Have a Heart is run by volunteers, every single donated cent goes straight to the dogs and cats! ❀ ...
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For many years, Animal-Kind International is supporting Namibia's less fortunate pets when they end up in a emergency health situation and when our Have a Heart family members need their booster vaccination or another parasite treatment. Mainly dogs and cats, but over the years donkeys, horses and Pinky the piglet were also helped.During the last 7 months of 2021 Animal-Kind InternationalAnimal-Kind InternationalAnimal-Kind International not only made it possible for 400 previous castrated dogs and cats in Namibia to receive their booster vaccination and parasite treatment, also 7 dogs and 7 cats were helped when in serious trouble. We couldn't save the life of all 7 dogs, but thanks to Animal-Kind International we were able to get them to a vet and give them the last act of kindness and end suffering.We would like to say the biggest THANK YOU to Animal-Kind International and it's supporters for giving us the chance to help Namibias animals in urgent need! <3Klick on the pictures to get some more details but please be aware that some of the pictures are graphic! ...
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Again, we owe you a few updates, but we will catch up over the next few days! Watch this space πŸ™‚First, two updates from Oshakati, where Dr Junias and his team from Oshana SPCA Vet Clinic have been doing amazing work, successfully trapping cats in urgent need of spay/neuter and rabies vaccination at two different locations. Teaming up with Oshana SPCA who sponsored the petrol and who take in small kittens if needed (look at their page in case you would love to add a new member to your family ❀), a lot happened! πŸ™‚At Oshakati Spar a total of 12 cats and at Ongwediva Medi Park 16 cats were Trapped-Neutered/spayed-Released (TNR).The hard work of Dr Junias and his team has such a positive impact on the 28 cats health, as well as the people around and the environment! Thank you so much! The best is, this is only the beginning, more will happen soon!!In case you are interested in some more info about TNR:TNR is the only humane way to help feral cats. Feral cats are a result of tame/house cats having kittens and those kittens not finding a home. Uncared for or dumped, (both by humans!) those cats have to find a way to survive. They go to places where they find food. Feral cats - when not spayed - multiply to hundreds in no time. They end up hungry and get no help when injured or sick - they suffer.To stop this suffering, the adult feral cats will have to get trapped, spayed/neutered and returned to the home they know. Returning the cats to their home and family group, sounds cruel to some people. Why not keep them and find a loving home? That works for very young kittens, but not for adult feral cats.The reason the feral cats have to go back to their home spot, are the following:- the cats are feral, they are used to be free and don't want to be touched by humans. Being locked up with humans around, stresses them. This is ok for a few hours during the operation, but not for weeks or months on end to come.- the feral cats' survival is dependent on a family structure. Removing adult cats from their family structure and relocating them is very, very stressful for them!- if a group is fully or partially removed, it will only open a space for other cats to move in. The new cats are not spayed/neutered and also not vaccinated against rabies. The problem is not solved, it's just shifted.- and then another big problem: where to bring the cats? There are still hundreds of tame, beautiful cats and kittens waiting for a loving home in all of Namibia's SPCAs and many rescue groups. Catching adult feral cats - who have a home - and then adding them to the cats who are looking for a home, is bad news. Better is to have them stay at their spot, have them spayed/neutered and vaccinated and keep an eye on them. When the group is not able to multiply anymore, the numbers will drop over time.Please note, injured/sick feral cats and cats that are not feral, but have dumped, are an exception. Here we have to find the best solution for the cat! Have-a-Hearts' priority is of course, to always have the best solution for a cat as well as for a dog!If you have any questions about TNR please comment on this post or send us a message 😊 ...
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We would like to thank all our teams, vets, supporters, sponsers, donors and volunteers for your valued contributions towards our ongoing efforts to reducing the stray cat and dog population in Namibia.We are grateful for each and every spay and neuter as we know, that this has a huge impact not only on many lives but also on our environment.If you would like to make a contribution towards achieving our aim, be it by volunteering or by a financial contribution, please send us a message via messenger or a email to haveaheartnamibia@gmail.comOur banking details are as follows:Account Name: Have a Heart NamibiaAccount number: 2000 266 940Branch: OutjoCode: 481-673A great Big Thank you!#haveaheartnamibia #savinglivesthroughsterilisation #spayandneuter ...
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Mariental is a town in much need of Have-a-Heart's help. The fantastic Dr Erna and her team at VetsWeb Mariental are planning their first township sterilisation drive funded by Have-a-Heart and they need your help. If you could help transporting animals from the township to the surgery or can help raise awareness in the community please contact the team: 081 658 9060.Thank you! ...
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2 weeks ago

Have-a-Heart Namibia
More feral cats are coming through the trap-neuter-return program in Rehoboth! These were the first three cats this week; two males and a female. Small drops in the ocean but every cat sterilised is one step closer to all feral cats in the area having a better life. ...
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2 weeks ago

Willem Esterhuysen
Kitties galore at Gobabis State Hospital.A tragedy unfolds... ...
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